Muslim views toward Islamic State after Paris

Being a Muslim during the current crisis involves dealing with tremendous hardships for something most can’t even control. After the attacks on Paris, there are still a few Muslims who stick to the Islamic State and their ways of operating. As we discussed in class there are several reasons why people join insurgencies that apply to the support for the current Islamic state. The biggest tendency is for their safety because most believe that their lives are in better hands trusting the Islamic State fathoms then to try and revolt against them. A recent poll has shown that “20% of Muslim respondents felt “some” or “a lot” of sympathy for “young Muslims who leave the UK to join fighters in Syria.” This shows that the majority of Muslims do not support the fight even though we perceive them all as supporters.

Contradicting to media beliefs the favorable view of Muslims is to not support recent events of the Islamic State. After the attacks in Paris, the media has portrayed Muslims mostly all as terrorists. Even in other countries they deal with hecklers who object them and tell them to leave the country. These Muslims came to these countries for freedom and opportunity and instead get profiled and abused. After the Paris misfortunes, there have been several instances of hate crimes against Muslims such as “In Fife, a man and a woman were violently assaulted by more than a dozen people outside their takeaway shop, their assailants berating them over the Paris atrocities. In a more heartening incident, passengers turned on a bigot yelling abuse at a 23-year-old Muslim woman on a train in Newcastle.” This is just a few examples of the everyday violence that Muslims have to live with. All of these social sanctions could factor into a change of support by the Muslim community.

Muslims in India protest against Islamic State

Muslims are now being forced to live in fear based on judgment principles. Most Muslims feelings are that the recent attacks are done by a criminal gang and an obstacle for Muslim faith. However, if the media and people continue to hate crime Muslims they may have no choice but to support the Islamic State because there is no one else who wants their support. Muslims have become a target for ISIS because they want the portrayal of Muslim refugees who are disliked. “Those responsible are not just bigots, but recruiting sergeants for Islamic State. When Isis executes its attacks, it has a script. It knows that Muslims will be blamed en masse in the aftermath.” This is exactly what ISIS understands, that if we continue to target all Muslims it could push them right into their hands for support. All of these grievances that are being experienced by the Muslims might lead them right into the fight with ISIS.

Sources

http://www.economist.com/news/middle-east-and-africa/21679152-there-far-less-sympathy-jihadists-rabble-rousers-think-what

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/11/17/world/europe/after-paris-attacks-a-darker-mood-toward-islam-emerges-in-france.html?_r=0

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/nov/25/islamophobia-isis-muslim-islamic-state-paris

 

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7 thoughts on “Muslim views toward Islamic State after Paris

  1. It is certainly true the number of Muslims who are terrorists is incredibly low, and the number who openly support terrorists is just as low. The most radical ones who use violence to further an agenda in any group are often used to represent the entire group.

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  2. This is a very fragile environment to exist within and even speak about. The threat of ISIS is great, and they need to be stopped from perpetuating their reign of violence in the Middle East. No one particular blanket statement can be made for all Muslims, the same can be said for Christians , and Jews. We need to focus on the American ideals of “all men are created equal” and “freedom of religion”. we need to stop focusing on what religion people believe in and start looking at the actions they take. Defend those who need defending, and stand up to those who oppress the innocent.

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  3. It is sad to see how much an appearance can change someones perception. Its also sad to see how innocent peoples lives are being effected because of who they are and what they are. It is not their fault that they happen to be associated with these Terrorists. It can also be said that who is abusing these innocent people aren’t to blame in a sense all of this is the few terrorists who have made a bad name for Muslims fault. Yes the innocent ones shouldn’t be harmed and everyone needs to realize it is not their fault. Why are people only discriminating against Muslims when Christians are bombing/ shooting up planned parenthood how come every Christian then isn’t being discriminated against? The thing is everyone should stop discriminating against and just join together and try and make this a place where people shouldn’t be afraid to practice what they believe and be who they are.

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  4. Though the recent attacks that took place in Paris have heightened the discrimination against Muslim’s I believe this is a deep rooted issue that has been going on for many years. Muslim’s are stereotyped and grouped together when in fact they should be seen as individuals. There should be no debate over whether or not Muslims are a threat. Terrorists are a threat, not Muslim’s. Not every Muslim is from Syria or Iran. It is not right to make people live in fear or feel ashamed of who they are. This is just sad. Hopefully something soon will change and we can stop stigmatizing.

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  5. It is inevitable to say that these issues related with Middle East Countries are difficult to deal with. The problems in Middle East can be traced toward 19th century, the age that Western Countries, such as the Empire of United Kingdom and Russia, invaded to gain resources and places for industrialization. There were some countries in Middle East, like Iran, that tried to absorb the ideas of Western Countries such as democracy, judicial courts that completely separates from the religions. However, these acts totally failed because of the objections by the clergies of Sunni and Shi’ite in the regions. These religions, especially the Fundamentalists, teach people to obey strict rules and some of them feel antagonism toward the Western Ideas. However, it is not good to have some stereotypes toward Muslims, as the writer of this post said because there are a lot of Muslims who hate terrorism and cherish the ideas of Religions of Islam such as tolerance, the mind caring others.

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  6. I agree with the comments made above. All Muslims are not terrorists and they should not all be grouped into one category. In a class that I am currently taken, I have learned about the many stereotypes that are associated with Muslims and they are wrong. Terrorists can come from any background and can be associated with any religion. Syrian refugees are fleeing from the same group of people that we are afraid of.

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  7. A very relevant post. Unfortunately stereo typing and type casting based on religion or ethnicity is still an all too common occurrence, exaggerated all the more so by the fear brought on immediately after an act of terrorism. A friend told me that recently, as they were walking back to their car someone shouted at them from a passing car, calling them a “terrorist” based on their ethnicity. This is unacceptable… extremism and the actions of radicals in a religion should never be viewed as the norm of the religion as a whole, that would only sow the seeds of persecution, and some of the language already being used by U.S. politicians in regards to how to prevent terrorism has been toeing that line dangerously, if not crossing it altogether.

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